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Pragmatic Capitalism

Practical Views on Money, Finance & Life

The “What is Enough” column….

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Cullen – apart from the completely transparent sucking up – this piece – although not nearly as “deep” as some of your Economic Myths series – struck home in a real, tangible way.

It is refreshing to see someone like yourself dispense practical, real world thoughts about tempering expectations to our reality. I learned that “enough” was 11 years ago – when I retired from policing – but then continued to work at a succession of ever increasing roles. Jobs have changed, salary has increased – but we are still living on the same budget we created 11 years ago! I planned this and have been fortunate enough to have been able to stick to it for the whole time. Needless to say – when “real” retirement hits in the next 24-36 months – we’ll be well prepared for any eventuality.

Thanks for a great column and keep up the solid writing!

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Posted by Mike Derbyshire
Posted on 03/30/2017 3:56 PM
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Cullen this is your best advice ever given – without turning into vapid self help shit that ‘know what’s enough’ notion could help save uber capitalistic societies from greed and over consumption and ultimately, exhaustion.

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Posted by Nico G
Answered on 03/31/2017 3:50 AM
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    Is a BMW really good? I went to the car showroom and found that they are made of cheap plastic parts just like all other cars. Also the interior design feels “gaudy” and impractical.

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    Posted by Furion Lfg
    Answered on 03/31/2017 1:15 PM
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      When I was in basic research a mentor pointed out the importance of evaluating instruments with the question of “does it provide new and important data” or “is it just a nicer version of capability I currently have”. The same thinking applies to personal spending. The Nikkor 16-35 zoom for my D750 gives me important new capability, but a BMW X3 doesn’t provide any more capability than my 2009 Ford Escape. When I was in grad-school we joked that a true sportsman always had far more money in the gear on the roof and inside their used SUV and for the most part that still holds. But everyone is different. I have friends who can’t understand why I drive cheap cars but have always had very good bicycles ($6000 to $10,000 in today’s dollars).

      However, teaching my kids money responsibility has been difficult. When I was a teenager, I considered $100 in my checking account as $0, in case something important came up, and as I aged I just raised that amount, $1000 in my early 20’s, $5000 in my late 20’s, up to a couple $100,000 in my late 40’s. There is an incredible freedom to not having money pressures, whatever your income level.

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      Posted by John Daschbach
      Answered on 03/31/2017 8:36 PM
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        Thanks guys. Really glad you liked it.

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        Cullen Roche Posted by Cullen Roche
        Answered on 04/01/2017 10:39 AM
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